Microdosing & Macrodosing: Cannabis Consumption Methods for Controlled Dosing

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Psychotropic and non-psychotropic cannabis oil concentrates are gradually metamorphosing the therapeutic landscape; something that is effectively transforming the nation’s perspective on cannabis. Back in 2016, approximately 234 million people around the world consumed cannabis. [1] This figure is steadily increasing as more U.S. states legalize weed for medical and recreational use.

Whether you choose to consume cannabis for medical purposes or for personal pleasure, it is imperative that you give the dosage some serious thought. Cannabis strains high in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) may produce unwanted side effects in large amounts.

Although the non-psychoactive cannabinoid known as CBD (cannabidiol) does not produce mind-altering effects, it might not work its therapeutic magic properly if the amount consumed is not sufficient. This is where microdosing and macrodosing come in – two cannabis consumption methods taking the legal weed industry by storm.

What is cannabis microdosing?

Consuming cannabis in small doses is known as “microdosing”. The term is associated with the threshold dose of a psychedelic substance. A sub-perceptual effect is the goal of cannabis microdosing, which involves consuming the lowest dose of THC for subtle changes in mood, mindset and relaxation.

Call it a trend, call it what you like, but cannabis microdosing is certainly gaining momentum in the legal weed industry. Various studies have revealed the benefits of microdosing, with one study concluding that low-dose vaporized cannabis may significantly improve neuropathic pain. [2]

A separate study in mice claimed that low doses of THC (when administered frequently,) may reverse ageing-related memory loss in older mice. [3]

What is cannabis macrodosing?

An individual’s unique biological structure will impact the therapeutic effects they experience when using cannabis. With that being said, some consumers may be tolerant to cannabinoids like THC, meaning that they will necessitate a higher dosage to feel fully satisfied.

“Dosing cannabis is unlike any therapeutic agent to which I was exposed in my medical training,” says the director of Integr8 Health, Dustin Sulak, D.O. “Some patients effectively use tiny amounts of cannabis, while others use incredibly high doses. I’ve seen adult patients achieve therapeutic effects at 1 mg of total cannabinoids daily, while others consume over 2000 mgs daily without adverse effects.” [4]

When you consider that (for example) most cannabis edibles are produced and sold in 10 mg doses, it’s understandable why many recreational and medical consumers are seeking out brands that specialize in cannabis “macrodosing” products. Typically, high-dose brands tend to develop weed-infused products that have been laced with as much as 300-500 mg of THC.

Conclusion

Sulak advises first-time consumers to start slow and progressively increase their dose, but not before abstaining from cannabis for at least 48 hours. By doing so, you can better assess how you feel, what medical symptoms you may have, as well as what mental state you find yourself in.

Make a note of your feelings after consuming a single milligram of THC and CBD. Combined, these cannabinoids may contribute to disease prevention and overall well-being, according to Sulak. Repeat the process and increase the dosage, if necessary.